The program is developed by the CDTRP Annual Scientific Meeting Planning Committee, co-chaired by Mamatha Bhat (Themes 4 & 5) and Micheal Khoury (Themes 1, 2, 3 & 5) and with feedback from the CDTRP community and Theme leads. Other members of the Planning Committee include:

Register here

PRE-SCIENTIFIC MEETING

Tuesday, December 6, 2022

All times are shown in Pacific Standard Time (PST)

Social In Person Activity: Wine Tour

Planning to arrive early? Join us for a vineyard tour of the beautiful Okanagan Valley region. More details to come!

  • Date: Tuesday, December 6
  • Time: Around 3pm
  • Extra fees will apply

“Heading to a winery is a wonderful way to support local, and get into the spirit with your friends and family, and to pick up wines to enjoy over the holidays!”

Sneak peak here.

Women in Transplantation Special Event

Women in Transplantation Event 

Women in Transplantation (WIT) is an initiative of The Transplantation Society to advance and inspire women transplant professionals and champion issues of sex and gender in transplantation. It operates as an independent initiative open to collaboration and partnership across professional societies and associations who share WIT mission and goals to achieve global diversity in reach, access and participation is essential to achieve WIT’s mission.

  • Date: Tuesday, December 6
  • Time: 7:00 – 8:30 pm PT

More details to come!

CDTRP ANNUAL SCIENTIFIC MEETING

Wednesday, December 7, 2022

All times are shown in Pacific Standard Time (PST)

This is a preliminary program.

More details to come.

More details to come.

The Frictions of Futurity and Cure in Transplant Medicine (“Frictions”) project team will host a 1-hour discussion lounge during the CDTRP 2022 Annual Scientific Meeting. The lounge is conceived to be a space to articulate diverse viewpoints, share knowledges, practices and ways of knowing, and engage with different forms of understanding the challenges, tensions, promises, and hopes that are attached to transplantation and in particular to the way that transplantation is both reveals and troubles concepts such as cure, risk, kin, and care. As social science and arts-based researchers interested both in understanding these aspects of transplantation, we would both be facilitating and documenting the conversations that take place.  

What is the study about? 

This study aims to better understand what it is like living with an organ transplant: from waiting to receive an organ, to challenges post-transplant. Investigators, who are artists and researchers, want to to understand how transplantation experiences impact individuals in multiple places and at different times. This study seeks to identify the different goals and needs of patients, their family members, physicians, and other experts involved in transplant. The results of this study will help contribute to best practices for care in solid-organ transplantation and to policies and guidelines on care. 

Why are researchers doing direct observation? 

Understanding the experiences and meanings of transplant recipients and clinical team members is central to this study. This information provides insights about care priorities, relationships, and emotion that may not arise in interviews. Direct observation enables the researcher to witness important interactions unfold in real-time, making for a more nuanced, sensitive, and accurate understanding of living with organ transplant. 

In addition to direct observation, researchers are interested in interviewing participants and inviting participants to join a group art-making workshop and/or work with a researcher-artist to create an audio-visual account (Photovoice) of their transplant experience. These activities will take place at UHN or online.  

The research team and artists involved in the project intend to claim sole ownership of any results that would come from this study. You will not receive any financial benefit that might come from the results of this study. 

Contact 

For questions about direct observation or if you would like to see the field notes taken during your visit, please contact: 

Principal Investigator: Dr. Suze Berkhout | suze.berkhout@uhn.ca 

The First Nations and Métis Organ Donation and Transplantation Network introduces its first book club. Participants will be asked to read the novel Five Little Indians by Michelle Good and attend a discussion gathering hosted by Dr. Caroline Tait, research lead of the Network. The book club is hoping to attract medical professionals who work in organ donation and transplantation, specifically liver transplant. The purpose of the book club is to provide a safe space for discussion about inter-generational colonial impacts upon Indigenous peoples, specifically the impact of residential schools, and how processes of colonialism directly contribute to health and social inequities experienced by Indigenous peoples today. The goal of this initial Book Club is to draw upon Indigenous fiction to create a safe and productive space to discuss complex health issues impacting First Nations, Métis, and Inuit peoples.

Requirement: Each participant must read the novel in advance and bring the book with them to book club.

More details to come.

Free pizza will be available for trainees who submit a writing sample.

Thursday, December 8, 2022

Xenotransplantation: The Path to Clinical Application

Dr. Pierson holds the W. Gerald and Patricia Austen Chair in Cardiac Surgery and is the Scientific Director of the Center for Transplantation Sciences at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.  He is a Professor of Surgery at Harvard Medical School, and visiting surgeon at MGH, where he participates clinically in thoracic transplantation and cardiac surgical intensive care.  He is an established NIH-funded investigator in the areas of translational cardiac allograft tolerance induction and the immunobiology of lung, heart, kidney, and liver xenotransplantation, and author of over 175 peer-reviewed original scientific papers, review articles, and book chapters.

Dr. Pierson received his medical degree from the Columbia University, and trained at University of Michigan, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Papworth Hospital, Cambridgeshire, England, in affiliation with Cambridge University.  He has served on the faculty at Vanderbilt University (1994-2002), University of Maryland (2002-2018), and Harvard University (2018-present).

Dr. Pierson is board certified in general and thoracic surgery, and is a fellow of the American College of Surgeons.  He is a member of the American Surgical Association, American Association of Thoracic Surgeons, American Society of Transplant Surgeons, International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and Society of University Surgeons, among others.  He is a past president of the International Xenotransplantation Association (2007-09), and current IXA Ethics Committee Chair.  He co-chaired WHO’s 1st International Consultation on Regulatory Requirements for Xenotransplantation Clinical Trials, held in Changsha, PRC, and was raporteur for the Geneva follow-up meeting.

The Frictions of Futurity and Cure in Transplant Medicine (“Frictions”) project team will host a 1-hour discussion lounge during the CDTRP 2022 Annual Scientific Meeting. The lounge is conceived to be a space to articulate diverse viewpoints, share knowledges, practices and ways of knowing, and engage with different forms of understanding the challenges, tensions, promises, and hopes that are attached to transplantation and in particular to the way that transplantation is both reveals and troubles concepts such as cure, risk, kin, and care. As social science and arts-based researchers interested both in understanding these aspects of transplantation, we would both be facilitating and documenting the conversations that take place.  

What is the study about? 

This study aims to better understand what it is like living with an organ transplant: from waiting to receive an organ, to challenges post-transplant. Investigators, who are artists and researchers, want to to understand how transplantation experiences impact individuals in multiple places and at different times. This study seeks to identify the different goals and needs of patients, their family members, physicians, and other experts involved in transplant. The results of this study will help contribute to best practices for care in solid-organ transplantation and to policies and guidelines on care. 

Why are researchers doing direct observation? 

Understanding the experiences and meanings of transplant recipients and clinical team members is central to this study. This information provides insights about care priorities, relationships, and emotion that may not arise in interviews. Direct observation enables the researcher to witness important interactions unfold in real-time, making for a more nuanced, sensitive, and accurate understanding of living with organ transplant. 

In addition to direct observation, researchers are interested in interviewing participants and inviting participants to join a group art-making workshop and/or work with a researcher-artist to create an audio-visual account (Photovoice) of their transplant experience. These activities will take place at UHN or online.  

The research team and artists involved in the project intend to claim sole ownership of any results that would come from this study. You will not receive any financial benefit that might come from the results of this study. 

Contact 

For questions about direct observation or if you would like to see the field notes taken during your visit, please contact: 

Principal Investigator: Dr. Suze Berkhout | suze.berkhout@uhn.ca 

The Frictions of Futurity and Cure in Transplant Medicine (“Frictions”) project team will host a 1-hour discussion lounge during the CDTRP 2022 Annual Scientific Meeting. The lounge is conceived to be a space to articulate diverse viewpoints, share knowledges, practices and ways of knowing, and engage with different forms of understanding the challenges, tensions, promises, and hopes that are attached to transplantation and in particular to the way that transplantation is both reveals and troubles concepts such as cure, risk, kin, and care. As social science and arts-based researchers interested both in understanding these aspects of transplantation, we would both be facilitating and documenting the conversations that take place.  

What is the study about? 

This study aims to better understand what it is like living with an organ transplant: from waiting to receive an organ, to challenges post-transplant. Investigators, who are artists and researchers, want to to understand how transplantation experiences impact individuals in multiple places and at different times. This study seeks to identify the different goals and needs of patients, their family members, physicians, and other experts involved in transplant. The results of this study will help contribute to best practices for care in solid-organ transplantation and to policies and guidelines on care. 

Why are researchers doing direct observation? 

Understanding the experiences and meanings of transplant recipients and clinical team members is central to this study. This information provides insights about care priorities, relationships, and emotion that may not arise in interviews. Direct observation enables the researcher to witness important interactions unfold in real-time, making for a more nuanced, sensitive, and accurate understanding of living with organ transplant. 

In addition to direct observation, researchers are interested in interviewing participants and inviting participants to join a group art-making workshop and/or work with a researcher-artist to create an audio-visual account (Photovoice) of their transplant experience. These activities will take place at UHN or online.  

The research team and artists involved in the project intend to claim sole ownership of any results that would come from this study. You will not receive any financial benefit that might come from the results of this study. 

Contact 

For questions about direct observation or if you would like to see the field notes taken during your visit, please contact: 

Principal Investigator: Dr. Suze Berkhout | suze.berkhout@uhn.ca 

Friday, December 9, 2022